Loco no 11

Loco no 11

Friday, 22 September 2017

O&K Steamed Up For Hard Work

In the early 1950's Nystrup Gravel's steam locos were not used regularly. The locos were stored in a long shed at the lorry loading ramp area. The daily traffic was handled by the company's IC locos. But when demand for gravel was at its peak during summer at least one steam loco was usually steamed up.
Steam loco no. 2 pulling a train of empty skips past Banke's Bakelite on its way to the pits

The extra loco provided an added ressource and enabled a more intense traffic to be kept up. Just a few years later the steam locos were sold as scrap. My model of Nystrup Gravel's steam loco no. 2 was built in 2002 on the basis of a Fleischmann 'Magic Train' steam loco in 1:45 scale. Too bad that the 'Magic Train' range is now out of production. I would love to rebuild one more to accompany no. 2.

Nystrup Gravel's first two locomotives on the same photograph. As the old Alpha E 10 is standing in front of the loco shed, several of the newer locos must have been out of service. Otherwise the one cylinder locomotive would have remained in its shed. It was used only when all other options had failed!

Monday, 18 September 2017

Fowler Pulling A Workers' Transport

Demand for gravel for a wide range of publicly funded construction works meant that Nystrup Gravel in the beginning of the 1930's had to find more effective ways of getting gravel to the customers. One result of the intiatives taken by director Holm was the acquisition of the large Fowler diesel. Another was the sudden appearance of two bogie passenger wagons for the transport of workers to and from the gravel pits.
The comfortable coach being enjoyed by workers on their way to work. Nystrup Gravel's two bogie coaches were unique to Danish industrial railways. No other industrial railway had such luxurious coaches. The state organisation for costal protection had a single bogie coach and a prison railway had a primitive homebuilt coach. Nystrup Gravel certainly was a company with a special railway - no wonder I chose to model it!

I built the two passenger wagons in 2010 from kits made by fellow modeller Daniel Caso fitted with homebuilt frames and bogies from Scale Link. Daniel is one of those modellers that take the extraordinary step to help others fabricating kits or useful pieces.
A coach during construction. The kit body is placed on a test frame made of three pieces of strip wood and half-built bogies.
Apart from the image at the top, I managed to catch the train made up from Fowler-loco and green coach on film as it passed the bridge and the loco shed.

Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Ancient Internal Combustion Locomotives on 600 mm Gauge

Some railway enthusiasts prefer steam engines and many railway modellers share the passion for steam locomotives. I have a soft spot for the earliest internal combustion engine locos. Some of the pioneers of IC-loco manufacture weren't particularly focused on design, leading to some wonderfully alternative visual expressions. My model of a Danish built Alpha E 10 should prove that.






Not many of the earliest IC locos have survived. They were built in limited numbers, probably too fragile to serve for long and with a technology that still had to mature fully. Very few of these locos exists today and fewer are in operation. Fortunately we can now add one to the list, as the Frankfurter Feldbahnmuseum in Germany is currently test running Oberursel 6095 from 1913. The loco has a Danish connection as it came to Denmark after World War 1 to a peat company. From there the loco was passed on to a contractor that later donated it to a childrens' play ground. It is doubtful if the loco ever worked much in Denmark, but If the loco had seen limited use until then, it certainly changed as children from Copenhagen could now play the poor thing to pieces (not mentioning the Danish weather's hard treatment). The loco was rescued by the Danish Industrial Railway Society in 1982, moved to safe in door storage in the 1990's and lent to the Frankfurter Feldbahnmuseum in 2003 becoming their property in 2007. I don't think I ever dared to dream to see the loco in running condition. I think I will be visiting Frankfurt soon!




Monday, 11 September 2017

Nystrup Gravel Running Session

Due to work, other obligations and a few teenage 'occupations' of our shed, the usual summer running sessions have been somewhat delayed. But now my small modules are set up and the first trains have been making their way across the crooked rails (that may still need some additional cleaning).
So far I have been running the gravel company's oldest locomotive and with some more running in, it will probably be a far more useful loco in1:35 scale than it ever was in reality.
  I haven't been modelling much during the summer. Rather I have been doing work on a real narrow gauge railway in company of a great bunch of men and women.
A great team of volunteers photographed on a sunny afternoon at the 40 years celebration at the Hedeland heritage railway.

As autumn is looming on the horizon I will be getting the workbench dusted off and made ready for new projects. But first I'll be enjoying some days of running trains on Nystrup Gravel's short line. Expect a few images here showing some of the trains travelling over the 600 mm track.

Monday, 28 August 2017

Modelling Inspiration

Ideas aren't coming from nothing. My inspiration comes from a wide range af sources. I have previously written about one particular book that has inspired me. In this post I will take you through a few other sources of inspiration.
A small narrow gauge peat railway in Klosterlund, Denmark. It's summer, the air is hot and I can almost hear the larch singing in the sky. The flowers are in full bloom and from the moor in the distance a little locomotive is pulling three simple wagons with peat over light and crooked rails. Behind the train you can just about see a few cows resting and enjoying the good weather. Just the kind of railway I love!

Obviously reality is a primary inspiration for me. Who wouldn't be inspired by the above photo? There are more great prototype locos and scenes than I can ever manage to model even if I lived to be 100 years.


Other modellers' work surely inspires too. I pick up that inspiration from several sources. The work of many talented modellers appears in Narrow Gauge and Industrial Railway Modelling Review and I honestly don't know where I would be modelling wise if that magazine wasn't available. A huge 'thank you' to editors, helping staff and authors. If you are not a subscriber, consider becoming one. Find out how to order a subscription here.
From my 'Review' collection. I'm still looking for issue 1. The open magazine is issue 47 with a briliantly written story of a small 0-16.5 slate quarry. Shows that inspiration doesn't have to come from one's own scale or theme.


However great a real paper magazine is, online inspiration can be found as well. A myriad of sites offer images, films and descriptions of real industrial railways (usually long gone, unfortunately) and advise on how to model them. The best I know is the NRGM-forum. You have to acquire a login, but that tiny trouble will repay endlessly. The forum is frequented by friendly expert modellers from all over our planet - some of them known from the 'Review'.



On my work bench I'm learning new things. Last evening I practised my weaving techniques as I was making revetments for my French artillery position. I used tooth picks and cheap wire from a hobby shop.
A short section of weaved revetment in 1:35 scale. My test worked out rather well. More sections are on their way.

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Gun Emplacement Progress

I have continued working on the French gun for my World War 1 diorama. The gun is now completely assembled, primed and painted. The kit went together well although there was a casting seam along the barrel that I didn't succeeded getting completely rid off. I left the wheel assemblies unglued as I wanted to be able to finetune the wheels' positions when fitting the gun into its emplacement.
The gun and recoil ramps ready for primer.

Gun primed with 'Chaos Black'.

The cover paint was mixed from several Vallejo greys and blues with a little white added. The shoes on the wheels were air brushed a light earth colour.
The gun painted.
With the gun well in progress I turned my attention to the diorama. I pulled out a picture frame the size of an old fashioned (or retro if you like) vinyl 33 rpm. LP record. With the glass removed it is a good starting point for small diorama in 1:35 scale - and a handy size for storage.


I played around with the gun and length of track to decide how to position them best. With everything settled I started building up trench walls and cutting timber for the gun pit.
Building up trench sides and test fitting floor timbers. The track will cut across the open ground in a gentle curve.
In my research on French trench design I stumbled over a modeller - Andrew Belsey - who does the most beautiful trench dioramas.
One of Andrew Belsey's trench cross section dioramas in 1:32 scale.
See his work on this blog. There is a lot of good tricks on how to do detailed groundwork and small details. My dioaram will not be as finely detailed as Andrew's!


Thursday, 10 August 2017

Refitting switch panel

After having finished the switch panel on the factory module, I thought the panel on the loco shed module could do with a little refurbishment. I had removed half the switches when Nystrup Gravel turned to digital command and control.
The old panel removed, the cut out cleaned up and ready for a new panel with no surplus holes in it.
The new panel in place, although I will have to correct its crooked angle. The panel is kept in place with double sided tape so it's no big thing to fix.

While I had the module out in the garden I took the opportunity to take a few snapshots as darkness settled over the loco shed.



Friday, 28 July 2017

Module Finished

The bakelite factory module is now finished (well as finished as a model railway ever gets). This afternoon I took advantage of one of the last days of my vacation to install wires and switches for the lights in the buildings. The switches and 12 V socket were arranged on the front of the module.

While the module gradually evolved towards finishing last summer, a few 'bald' spots still remained. These were taken care of this nice summer evening while I enjoyed the working lights in the buildings.
As the sun sets there is apparently still activity inside the buildings.

One guy went home after turning out the lights.

Finally the last guy at Banke's Bakelite closed up as well.

A driver and his Bedford O having a little break in front of one Nystrup's small industries.The little 600 mm. gravel line running between factory and parking area is almost invisible.

In the yard of Pedersen's Machine Shop a lot of work must have gone into a thorough clean up. No trace of all the metal parts usually strewn everywhere. Shortly after this photo was made, stuff began to build up again.
Being a slow modeller I seem to take forever to get the smallest of tasks done. I'm glad I only build a small module at the time. A whole layout would probably feel quite overwhelming.

Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Ruston & Bucyrus Excavator

In my last blog update in June I showed some new photos of Nystrup Gravel's large Menck excavator. Nystrup Gravel's first excavator (as far as I know) was the Ruston & Bucyrus delivered in 1938. Here are a few images of the machine in one of the gravel company's pits west of Nystrup.
The excavator driver obviously had a hard bicycle ride to the gravel pit. Here he is taking a break before beginning the day's work.

A side view of the Ruston & Bucyrus RB-17.

The R&B excavator is a 1:35 resin kit from Accurate Armour and a brilliant kit. I highly recommend it. Even if the kit is large and looks complicated you don't have to be an expert to put it together and produce an excellent result. I built my excavator in 2003 and made minor changes to the kit parts, primarily to show off some of the detailed interior.
A rear view during construction. I cut out the right rear door to show off the engine and radiator.

The interior during painting. I still haven't fitted wire to the drums.

The finished excavator on a heavy load trailer.


As usual the tracked tractor 'Stalin' was standing in the pit waiting for its next task. The tractor originally belonged to a Soviet Army artillery unit, was captured by the German forces in 1941, brought to Denmark and bought by Nystrup Gravel after the war.
Lovely weather and a robust piece of equipment.

Monday, 3 July 2017

French Artillery Position

I have previously built several 1:35 models of wagons and one loco from the French artillery railways of World War I. As we are currently 100 years away from that historic conflict I had planned to build a WWI model each year between 2014-2018 to commemorate the war. I have been quite unable to keep that promise.
My scratch built 1:35 model of a Campagne petrol loco from the French Army. Here it tows a standard Pechot wagon built from a 13'me Dragon kit in resin and white metal.

Charmed by a Blitz kit of an antique looking French cannon and motivated by a friend in France, I am planning  to at least partially keep my promise. My friend in France gave me the chance to buy a kit from long gone 13'eme Dragon from Paris of a Pechot Citerne wagon. I will be making a little diorama with a gun emplacement, a length of track and some figures. The Pechot Citerne (or any French 600 mm. wagon) can be placed on the track.
Col de la Schlucht: a 120 mm Modele 1878 in position in a wooded area at the foot of the German strongpoint Lingekopf in the Vosges region. Image from the Academie de Strasbourg.


The 'de Bange 120 mm modele 1878' beginning to look like the prototype. I still have to fit the 'shoes' to the belts around the wheels.

The assembly of the gun is progressing well . The parts fit well and the 'shoes' on the wheels took much less effort than I had anticipated. Consequently it may be ready for priming and painting quite soon. The Pechot wagon is next on the schedule together with a base for the diorama.
Unpacking the Pechot kit. The water tank is a heavy lump of resin. Two cross members mounts underneath for bogie mountings. The majority of parts are for the bogies.

Sunday, 25 June 2017

A Visit to the Gravel Pit

As the weather was sunny I took a bike ride to one of Nystrup Gravel's active gravel pits. I wanted to see if I could get a glimpse of some of the equipment Nystrup Gravel used for digging up the precious gravel. There were no problems entering the pit and no one objected to me taking a few photos.

Nystrup Gravel's large Menck M 60 was working in the eastern end of the gravel pit. It looked as if it was preparing to relay the 600 mm. tracks in that part of the pit.

An action shot of the Menck swinging its bucket while working in the pit.
Apart from the new Menck excavator I also located the old Stalinets tracked tractor. The tractor was used to pull equipment in the gravel pits and to pull up trees before removing the topsoil when expanding the pits.
The Soviet tractor in service at Nystrup Gravel. I forgot to remove my bicycle before taking the photograph
I didn't manage to locate the Ruston & Bucyrus excavator, but it could have been working in the western part of the pit or in the other pit. Read about Nystrup Gravel's excavators here.

Thursday, 15 June 2017

Firefighter's Helmet

When I finished my Land Rover fire tender I wanted to display a typical period fire fighter's helmet in the car. I didn't know where to find them in 1:35 scale, though. A few days ago it dawned on me that I had my granddad's helmet in the shed. Examining it, I thought I could make a model of it using a World War 1 French helmet - the M15 Adrian. I had such a helmet from a Scale Link white metal kit and it only took half an hour to turn it into a model resembling my granddad's helmet with the help of files, sand paper, AC-glue and thin plasticcard. It is not an accurate scale model but a resonably approximation.
My granddad's helmet from when he was a volunteer fire fighter in rural Butterup. The helmet is made from a sort of
fiberglass and I doubt it would stand up to much heat.




The tiny 1:35 helmet in front of the real thing. I filed the French helmet flat on the underside and glued a piece of thin plasticcard on. The plasticcard was filed to shape, making the rim wider.

I painted the finished helmet 'Pale Sand' and gave it a covering of gloss varnish. The insignia on the helmet's front was given a drop of copper paint. The helmet is now fitted on the middle seat of the Land Rover.
A cruel enlargement of my little Danish firefighter's helmet in 1:35.

The helmet resting in the Land Rover.

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Second Hand Locomotive Jacks for Nystrup Gravel

In the early fifties the management from Nystrup Gravel was on a shopping trip to one of the light standard gauge railways being closed due to competition from road traffic. Among the stuff being brought home over the next weeks was four locomotive jacks. Probably a tad large for the Nystrup locos, they had the benefit of being cheap.
Having just arrived, the jacks are being examined by two of Nystrup Gravel's workers.

In my last post on the 1:35 scale jacks, I was half way through the assembly. I met no obstacles gluing the remaining parts together. I primed the four jacks and the two girders and air brushed the jacks a medium grey. Bolt heads and iron fittings were painted dark brown and black. Before priming the girders needed a little putty and sanding on the top to hide some mould seams.
The four jacks ready for a layer of primer. The jacks are secured to the plywood with a small piece of double sided tape.

Primed and ready for painting.

After the main colours were dry, I gave the moving parts on the jacks a mix of dark grey and black from the air brush. Finally the jacks were given a wash of thinned oil paints, dry brushing with acrylics and picking out oily details with gloss varnish. The parts of the jacks closest to the ground were air brushed with a thin mix of light earth and thinner. I added Roman numerals in red.
The lorry backing into position to unload the jacks in front of the loco shed.

There isn't much space to spare. A worker helps to guide the lorry driver getting into position in front of the loco shed.

Close up of jack no. 2. Solid equipment for a 600 mm. narrow gauge railway

With the jacks ready for action, Nystrup Gravel's chief mechanic is now confident that even the heaviest locos can be lifted for thorough running gear maintenance.

Thursday, 8 June 2017

Land Rover Fire Tender Finished

After a very long production time I have now finished the Series 1 Land Rover fire tender. I really have been tested on my build and paint sequence planning on this kit. A true puzzle. Now the little car is ready to deliver sterling service to the Nystrup community.
The local volunteer fire brigade's Land Rover left all by itself in front of Banke's Bakelite factory?

With the kit building finished enough to start painting, the little Land Rover received a layer of primer before I took up the difficult task of choosing an appropriate red colour for the car. I ended up with a choise of Vallejo 'Ferrari Red' chosen over the obvious 'Fire Red' for its lighter tone.
The little car air brushed red. Detail painting next.

Detail painting was mostly a question of painting tires dark grey, seats a nice contrasting medium green and metal parts in varying metal colours. The license plates and writing on the doors came from 'Skilteskoven' and were applied without any fuss as usually. Dials on the instrument panel and pump control panel were made with dry transfers from Archer. After that I glued hose reel, pump assembly, doors, suction hoses and pump control panel in place. I applied a light covering of matt varnish over the entire model.
Detail painting in progress.

I chipped the cab floor and gear box top lightly with brown and gun metal paint and dirtied up the floor a bit as well. The tires were lightly dusted and painted with light earth in the tire treads. I used dark brown oil paint heavily thinned to give the car a light wash to make it look a little worn and enhance details. A little further wear on exposed parts were added with a soft pencil.

Two volunteer firefighters ready for an exercise one early June evening. Perhaps they wait for a pal to show up for the training?

A view from above showing the general layout of the Land Rover.

The last parts to be added was windscreen glazing, steering wheel and the windscreen wiper. A few rolled up fire hoses were placed in the rear. Now I would like to locate some firefighters' helmets in 1:35 of a typical Danish 1950's model. The volunteer fire brigade must be properly equipped.